‘Girls’ Season 2, Episode 5: ‘One Man’s Trash’ Review

Hannah is drawn to an older, handsome doctor and his successful lifestyle.

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This week’s episode of ‘Girls’ was a lot about Hannah. No signs of Marnie, Jessa and Shosh. Hannah suddenly leaves her job at Grumpys after her boss, Ray got into a row with a local homeowner over trash. The homeowner was Joshua (Patrick Wilson) – not Josh – a handsome, 42-year-old, recently-separated doctor. Hannah walked out of her job after the row and tracked Joshua down at his house. Initially she refused his invitation to come in on the grounds that she could be letting herself in for a Ted Bundy situation, but then she rushed through the door into his perfect home. What followed was two days in which Hannah drooled over Joshua and his possessions, swiftly followed by lots of sex, topless table tennis, fainting and an emotional meltdown which subsequently pushed Joshua away. It’s doubtful we’ll ever see Joshua again.

Hannah was exposed in more ways than one. Naturally we saw a lot of her self-indulgent naked body, something we’d come to expect, even when it’s more than we’d like to see. What we weren’t expecting was her emotional vulnerability when she admitted to Joshua that although she wanted to ‘feel it all’ she was lonely, broken and just wanted to be happy. It’s baffling however whether she was saying she wanted the physical trapping of success, or a caring, stable relationship or a way to sustain her writer’s lifestyle without the stress of a full-time paying job and a flatmate (given that she may now have neither). Perhaps she meant all of the above.

Although the episode had a number of unrealistic and uncharacteristic elements it felt like a fantasy that Hannah was playing out. Nevertheless her emotional instability and neurotic behaviour bore the usual hallmarks of ‘Girls’. It also allowed for character development as echoed by the stripping away of life-as-they-knew-it for Marnie and Jessa and the impact it had on the girls’ friendships. Question is, given Hannah’s recent bouts of pushing away her friends, jobs and flatmates (but yet trusting a stranger with her deepest twentysomething-emotions) who will she turn to now. She’ll either need to work at those relationship if she expects the support of her friends or she’ll have to sort out her fairy tale alone.